Case Study

CREATING UNIQUE DIGITAL EXPERIENCES

St. Mark’s School | Enrollment Campaign

What do a 14-year-old and 40-year-old have in common? Not much. Then why are enrollment communications created to speak to both segments simultaneously?

Rethinking this traditional approach was the foundation for the microsite that we developed for St. Mark’s School. Our research showed that teenagers are drawn to visual sites with minimal copy and that they are primarily visiting these sites on their phones. Client research indicated that the student, in many instances, makes the final decision on where s/he is going to go to school, reinforcing their role as a critical audience. Additionally, our client intake revealed that the ideal St.Mark’s candidate is someone who is curious and looking to define who they are going to become.

A Social Journey

As a result of our research and insights, we created a microsite that focuses solely on the students’ journey through St. Mark’s. Influenced by social media, the design includes; an unconventional placement of the navigation; a vertical and horizontal scrolling experience; an animated map, and stickers that jiggle, alerting students to additional hidden content.

Covid-19

A unique challenge we faced was the inability to shoot original photography and video due to the COVID virus. Fortunately the school has extensive, well cataloged galleries, and we were able to curate a set of images that captured the community and correlated with the copy. We also created new, punchy videos from their existing videos to specifically connect with a younger audience.

Concise Copy

This visual experience was complemented by short headlines, captions, and quotes to allow for multiple visual entry points.

The Parent Experience

To parallel the Student Journey we also created a Parent Experience. This curated story takes the parent through key academic, experiential, and student life information — providing a sense of the lifelong educational and career impacts that St. Mark’s will have upon their child.